Tesla HW2 Autopilot Software: What We Know So Far

Technology
Tesla HW2 Autopilot Software: What We Know So Far Open Grid Scheduler / Flickr

Tesla wanted to start this year with a bang by introducing its latest autopilot update. The company took a step forward and planned a breakthrough for self-driving cars in 2017.

This year, new owners of newly released Tesla cars will have the highly-anticipated Autopilot update. Unlike prior cars unveiled to the public, vehicles built after October, commonly known as HW2 (hardware 2), were initially released without the full suite of Autopilot features.

The update reportedly provides advanced semi-autonomous driving that can be used on the highway. According to TechCrunch, the prior release was due to the company’s decision to ship software and hardware to fully enable cars to self-drive in the long term.

On the other hand, Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted that the company would add a number Autopilot features to vehicles. This is to get on par with its older models in the short term.

Tesla Updates And Features

Electrek previously reported that the company started releasing its update to the first 1,000 cars in its fleet. The buzz update includes Forward Collision Warning, Autopilot’s Traffic Aware Cruise Control feature and Auto steer. However, the latter would only be enabled at low-speed as a beta feature.

One of the car owners, Kendall Cain, happened to be among those 1,000 owners. Cain shared the release notes of the new update.

The first phase of Enhanced Autopilot features is now available on your vehicle. We’ve designed these new Autopilot features to give you more confidence behind the wheel, increase your safety on the road, and make driving in traffic less frustrating. Similar to the autopilot function in airplanes, you need to maintain control and responsibility of your vehicle while enjoying the convenience of Autopilot in Model S.

The company offered the world a safety feature to help car owners feel at ease on the road. A number of present owners have been sharing videos online, showing how the updates helped them avoid seemingly inevitable accidents.