Pentagon Test Fires SM-6 Weapon Interceptors in Rapid Succession, at a Single Ballistic Missile Target

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Pentagon Test Fires SM-6 Weapon Interceptors in Rapid Succession, at a Single Ballistic Missile Target PHOTOGRAPH: David B Gleason |

The Pentagon recently test-fired SM-6 weapon interceptors to see its capability in hitting the single target. The SM-6 is also called an active seeker, which means it can receive or send a signal. Moreover, it can analyze signals and respond to it, making it a powerful addition to the U.S.’ weaponry.

The electromagnetic signals travel at the speed of light. The SM-6 can send a signal and receive it back. Once it receives the signal, it can determine the size, shape, speed and even the configuration of any approaching threat. Its computer algorithm can calculate the exact distance of an object.

As an active seeker, the weapon gives other missiles to have a better manipulation of attacking targets at sea. It does not rely on ship-based illuminator to bounce off a signal because it already does the job of accepting and analyzing signals.

The Pentagon fired the interceptor weapons in rapid succession at a single ballistic missile target. The technological upgrade will allow a ship commander to fire several SM-6 interceptors in rapid succession. If the official opts for a slower firing method instead of the rapid succession, the commander can fire the missiles within a short interval.

Previously, ships cannot fire interceptors in rapid succession that decreases the prospect of an interception. With the new SM-6, the ships can fire the interceptor one after the other, increasing the interception of an incoming hostile missile. Moreover, the ability to fire in rapid succession would mean that the ship commander can intercept more than one missile at once.

The new SM-6 of the Pentagon utilizes its own ‘seeker technology’

Officials explained that a ship can ‘illuminate core communicate’ with the missile. It can be done at the simultaneous to the time that the missile is looking for its target. Typically, if the technology is on pure active mode, it can go on its own.

The SM-6 active seeker technology allows the missile to utilize its own seeker technology. The test had two missiles in the air. The officials wanted to make sure that the active seeker is focusing at the missiles in the air. The officials wanted to make sure that the active seeker is focusing at the target, not at the other missile which serves as a distraction. The simulations revealed that the missile will not look at the other missile but rather focus on the target.

In December 2016, the U.S. Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy launched a missile defense test in the Pacific Ocean. The demonstration was a success after they successfully fired two interceptors at an incoming medium-range ballistic missile.

Footage of SM-6 intercept test

Source: Scout, Defense Daily

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